Seeing the Invisible One

In an earlier blog post, I wrote extensively about how ministers of the Gospel shouldn’t act as though they gave up “something big” to pursue the call of God in their lives.  However, there is a person who probably could or should talk about what they gave up: Moses.  Moses didn’t just sacrifice a nice six figure job and the comforts of a home with a backyard to follow Jesus.  He turned his back on being the son of Pharaoh’s daughter.

What exactly does it mean to reject being the son of Pharaoh’s daughter?  For 40 years, Moses was educated in reading and writing the Egyptian language, he was taught the language of Cain, trained in mathematics, astronomy, architecture, music, medicine, law, diplomacy and geography.  He was also trained in archery, swimming, and horseback riding.  He had the world at his fingertips and wealth beyond measure.  He could have had any woman he ever wanted and anything he ever desired.  Some believed that he was in line to one day be the next Pharaoh due to his adoption into the family.    And he willingly gave up all of that to pursue Jesus.  He had a right to brag about what he gave up to follow the call of God.

Clay Werner begins his book, “On the Brink” by looking at the life and ministry of Moses after he follows God and gives us the right to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter.  His life was not glamorous nor one that we would envy or want.  Think about the life Moses had after he gave everything up for God.  He tried to deliver the people of Israel on his own, but that backfired and they didn’t even understand him.  He then spends the next forty years of his life in a wilderness taking care of sheep.

After all that, he encounters God and God tells him that Moses will be used to deliver the people from bondage.  But then God says something interesting, “Moses, you are going to go and demand that Pharaoh release my people.  But when you tell him that, I am actually going to harden his heart and he will refuse you.”  That’s what Moses gets for leaving everything to follow God!

God tells Moses that the people will listen to him, but then Scriptures reveal to us that they actually wouldn’t listen and Moses ends up complaining to God about the very thing God said they would do.  What Moses experienced from his own people could be summarized as animosity.  If Moses didn’t provide what they wanted, when they wanted it, they would complain and perhaps even consider stoning him.  He would be called a proud man, one that was interested in seeking his own glory in their deaths.  The people that he was over had spiritual Alzheimer’s – constantly forgetting what God did for them while grumbling and complaining about what they didn’t have.  This was the “reward” for giving up everything to pursue God.

Moses was constantly listening to their grumbling.  The people thought Egypt was like paradise and wanted to return there.  They complained that the food God provided for them wasn’t lavish enough for their tastes.  He was also constantly dealing with betrayal.  His own brother, Aaron, formed a false god for the people to worship.  He then joined forces with Miriam (Moses’ sister) and sought to oust Moses from leadership.  There were the 250 people that joined forces with Korah and opposed Moses.  On top of that, he had to deal with the day-to-day caring of the people and their needs.

This was the life Moses lived for sacrificing everything to pursue God.  Ministry wasn’t as grand as he expected it to be.  The life of Moses is a reminder that we will all face various and uncountable circumstances and individuals that will test and try our patience and endurance on a repeated basis.

How does Moses respond?  When he was provoked, he never sought revenge but remained calm and grieved that the sins of the people were against God and not against him.  His disposition was never one of hatred, but of love.  He was willing to suffer the loss of his own peace and comfort rather than defend himself or respond in the same manner that they treated him.

If you endured anything that is painful because of the actions of other people, you know that it is impossible to respond like Moses did apart from God’s renewing grace in our lives.  We are to be forgiving because Christ forgave us and we should seek to imitate it in our relationships with others.  We are to endure much from others because we love them.  We are to pray for them because we seek their welfare and long for them to be restored to God and others.  We are to imitate Christ in all things.

Moses never gave up or quit.  We never see him walking out on the people.  We never see him exploding on the people after years of pent up frustration and anger.  It’s amazing what we do see.  We see Moses falling on his face and pleading with God to save His people and not destroy them.  We see him standing in the gap when the justice of God is being poured out on the people.  We see him praying for the restoration of his back-stabbing sister after she sought to overtake his authority.  No wonder the Bible says that he was one of the most meek and humblest person on the face of the earth.

How was Moses able to do this?  Was he more holy than the rest of us?  Of course not.  The Bible is brutally honest about Moses’ shortcomings as well. He didn’t want to obey God and actually suggested that God messed up in choosing Moses as a leader.  He even had the audacity to recommend someone else to God as a possible leader.  There were times he was self-centered.  You see situations where his anger comes out.  Ultimately, he doesn’t obey God and loses the opportunity to enter the Promised Land because of his disobedience.

How did Moses endure and how do we endure when life gets hard?  Hebrews 11:27 gives us a small glimpse of what enabled Moses to keep going in the midst of so much disappointment, opposition and persecution.  The writer of Hebrews tells us that Moses “endured as seeing him who is invisible.”  Even though this sounds simple, this verse is deeper and more profound than we realize.

[pl_blockquote]The reason our frustrations run deep, the reason our anger gains control, the reason our endurance fades away is because we take our eyes of God and His Word and we focus on the dirt, junk, hardness, stubbornness, and challenges of the situation and the people around us.  Even though we believe the Word of God and can intellectually say that God is with us, we live our lives as functional atheists with God nowhere to be seen in the way we look at things, feel about things, and talk about things.[/pl_blockquote]

We need the Holy Spirit to constantly remind us that God is working behind the scenes – Someone who is infinitely powerful, wise, loving and sovereign has a plan that will be brought about in His perfect time and in His perfect way.

Knowing this doesn’t take away the difficult situation or magically make people disappear from our lives.  It doesn’t take away the pain and hurts that people cause in our lives.  However, it does place everything in the context of a world and life that God reigns over in mercy.

In Colossians, the Apostle Paul prayed that we “would be strengthened all power, according to his glorious might, for all endurance and patience” (1:11).  Why do we need power?  Why does God need to strengthen us?  Not so that we can have great lives and successful ministries, but because Paul understands that as messengers of the gospel we live in a broken world with broken people.  He knows that we will be tempted not to fight the fight, tempted to walk away from the race, tempted to quit.  Therefore, he prays that we get power so that we can endure and have patience.

What Moses endured and what we endure in life, even though it is painful, shouldn’t surprise us.  Our prayer should be “God help me to see, through eyes of faith, him who is invisible.”

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